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consequences of changes in election procedures. we almost always get what we think we're going to get but then there's always something else that follows on. and one is, the behavior of voters with an expectation, particularly in an era of e-government. why shouldn't my records and ballots be available where ever i choose to go? the second thing, and military installations if you want to improve the child halls, the general always makes the food better. one of the things i think is interesting with election officials is how many of us vote on election day. how many of us experience that line, that q. and the answer is, most of us vote absentee because of that responsibility. so one of the things i've tried to do over the years is ideal in advance to ago and i stand in line and i learned a lot. i learnt a lot by listening to people, but that may be something as a professional goal for each of us is experienced the line come experience the way, experience the location. all right? >> my name is lorenzo. i have almost 10 months experience in the selection process. i worked at a trainer an
been active in democratic circles. she was the national director for howard dean's 24 -- 2004 election. she helped to unseat an 18 year republican incumbent. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator frank and i and minnesota. she defeated norm coleman, correct? she is a graduate of c-span.o [indiscernible] university in minnesota. she has a lot to say and then we will field questions from all of you. thank you, stephanie. >> thank you all so much for coming out. good morning. again, my name is stephanie schriock, president of emily's list. as mentioned, i grew up in butte, montana, where my heart and soul still reside. special thanks to the national press club for setting the solemn. it really is an honor for me to be here today. for those of you who do not know as much about emily's list, emily's list has been around for 27 years. we are solely committed to electing pro-choice democratic women to office up and down the ballot across the country. as mentioned, we had a good election cycle in 2012. two years before that, and would save like most folks, i was ready to see the 112th
the past four years, and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debates with implications beyond the health care industry packing our large -- impacting our larger fiscal policy and social concerns. we are fortunate to have with us today mr. brussard to share insights on the developing policy. prior to joining humana in 2011, he was an executive with the corporation, and before that, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. with that background, mr. brussard brings to the podium today a broad perspective on the health care issues facing the country. he has an undergraduate degree from texas texas a&m, and mba fm university of houston. we look forward to your comments today on this very important topic. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you, thank you, everyone. [applause] >> well, thank you, and i really appreciate the opportunity to address each one of you. as we talk today, our nation is actually wrestling with one of the largest issues probably in a lo
. and we also just had a little thing called an election. remember that? you know, when just over a month ago, the country rejected republican ideology. but the gop hasn't learned a thing. they're threatening a government shultdown. voting against disaster relief, pushing radical anti-abortion measures. they might actually be funny if they weren't so contemptible. >>> with me now, bob schram, a democratic strategist and columnist for "the daily beast" and abbyhuffington. >>> can the gop learn the chris christie lesson? or are they drinksiing too much from the tea party? >> he's conceivably a very strong candidate for them in 20167. but increasingly, i think he can't be nominated. it's not just that he embraced or worked with the hurricane, it's not just that he called john boehner to account for denying hurricane relief. it's that he uses that word compromise. he believes in governing. and he'd have to run in a party whose primary voters think the first qualification to the presidency is that you hate the dwovt. so i think he's a lock for reelection, i think he's a way forward and i think
elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> i refer to the tea party class of the congress, they believe they will do precisely what they were elected to do, which is to roll back all obama initiatives and cut spending a lot of them thought that the debt ceiling should not be increased. basically they believe that their job is to obstruct barack obama and then once there is a republican president in place, to have a better business climate with more deregulation or the funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. yes, i think they do believe that. flashing forward a little bit, we have that fiasco of 2011. when we were taken to the brink of a fiscal cliff what we were about to see again, the thinking on the part of the house republicans leadership was maybe our tea party question will realize that compromise is not such a bad thing. the opposite occurred. they went home and the people tend to be the activists of their party and those people tend to be the tea party and they were the ones screaming and asking why did you accept a deal? there have bee
and a new election is called. >>> prime minister shinno abe has -- the council on economic and fiscal policy is one of his two key pillars of his economic plan, along with a new task force to revive the economy. he chaired the first session of the council which reopened on wednesday after over three years of suspension. the financial minister, and bank of japan governor and four specialists from the private sector also took part. >> translator: in this panel we will discuss key policy matters to revitalize the japanese economy. i hope the members will draw up an outline of the government's economic and fiscal policies by the middle of this year. >>> as a first step to revitalize japan 'economy, they discussed a stimulus package worth nearly $230 billion. it focuses on public works projects. abe also asked the panel to look for ways of cooperation to pull the country out of deflakes. >>> their agenda includes adjusting tax rates for the wealthy. a tax panel made up of policy chiefs. wants to compile the agenda between the main opposition. officials called for the government to take low-income
and have a good day. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> a record number of women were elected to the u.s. u.s. house and senate in november. there are now more women in the u.s. u.s. senate. conversation women candidates who ran for office in 2012. this 35 minute event is hosted by emily's list which is a political action committee that supports pro-choice women candidates running for congress and governor. >> the national press club here and we are privileged to have stephanie schriock, the president of emily's list to be here today. as they well should after their spectacular when in the last presidential election. stephanie has been very active in democratic circles. she was national finance director for howard dean's 2004 election. she then helped the united states senator john -- unseat an 18-year-old incumbent in the state of montana. stephanie also managed the campaign of senator franken in minnesota and she defeated norm colman. correct? she is a graduate of man caught a state university in minnesota and she grew up in montana. here is stephanie, the president of emily's list w
in the last election. wherever they can they'll turn against the president and his appointees. it's as simple as that. >> jennifer: do you think the white house, because of his previous confirmations being relatively easy, do you think the president thought lou's confirmation would be easy as well. >> no, i don't. the president came in and i got to hear from all of them. i will tell that you they are really of the understanding now and it's very different from the first year, the first administration that the non-stop partisan wear warfare from the republicans will continue. the only way to deal with this is to confront it. i think that they're determined to make sure the president has his own team in place at the cabinet and his policies will be implemented. >> jennifer: this is so interesting to me, do you think that suggests what you said there, that he's not going to be bowed by what will be objections by the senate no matter what. they're going to come no matter what. he'll put in place the team that he wants. if that isn't the case, why wouldn't he have stuck with susan rice, for exampl
champion in the years to come. to have some kind of revolution but when the next election for speaker happens to republican conference conservatives especiallespeciall y within the caucus will remember how cantor handled the fiscal cliff and that may help them. there were other high-profile republicans who voted it had interestiinteresti ng votes. paul wright in the house voted for it. marco rubio on the senate votes no on it. what he think the implications are about? >> guest: to see there are 2016 implications is a little far-fetched but if you love politics you have to look at it. when i was inside of the house chamber watching the fiscal vote, he really is a power player within the party. one of the most important things he is done since the campaign is aligned himself for speaker john boehner and a lot of people did not expect this. one of the the reasons his dumbest and i've spoken people who are close to right write is he wants to make 2013 if budget year. in order to do that he needs boehner support so i don't think ryan will actively break with boehner. >> guest: we have not
election because of controversial statements on the israeli reluctance. among the reason for that concern and in some cases outright opposition. seven of the 12 republican members of the armed services committee expressing some opposition with at least three senators already saying they will vote no. senator david fisher saying, i will be a no-vote and on the floor. south carolina senator lindsay gramm calling hegel and antagonistic and in-your-face nomination to all of those who support israel. freshman senator ted crews of texas absolutely unloading while calling him too weak for the job >> it is interesting. the president seems bound and determined to proceed down this path despite the fact that his record is troubling. he has not been a friend, and in my view, the united states should stand unshakeable with the nation of israel, and he is consistently advocating weakness with respect to our enemies, with respect to the nation of iran, he has exposed sanctions, and the job of the secretary of defense is to be a serious, credible strength and a deterrent and, unfortunately, i think weak
parties, no breakup, no pulling away, no clever arrangement before the election in may 2015? you will be industry working together until the day that election is called, on time and on schedule? >> let me take the second of the question first. i've always said, nick has always said, this is a full five your coalition. the public wants us, as nick has just said, to work hard on their behalf right through this parliament to fix the problems that we have inherited and to set out and deliver the long-term plans we've spoken about. for me it is absolutely five your plan, a five your parliament, a five your government. it's about work. it's about delivery, not partisanship. on the first part of your question, i hate to sort of spoil the party, but let me put it like this. we are married, not to each other. we are both happily married. this is a government, not a relationship. it's a government about delivering for people, because of the mess we are left in by the previous government, because of the huge challenges that we face. what we said to people two and half years ago was that we
of 201. baseball elects no players to the hall of fame. jason star will talk about why this hand and what it means. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ "southern wild." >> "silver linings playbook." >> "zero dark thirty". >> "lincoln." steven spielberg and kathleen kennedy producers. >> "les miserables." >> "life of pi." ang lee. >> "amore" nom noise
. that came before my book came out, the election day, but i was worried. and he said don't worry. he said everybody knows that my father had an affair with gloria swanson and i know my father was an anti-semite. and whatever you find enright is going to be sure to the man that i know and love and what is out there. and i said, okay. i want full access to everything. the family and the documents and everything that is stored at the kennedy library in boston that has been closed to researchers in washington. we will see the book when it was between hardcover and not before. and i won't be coming back to you for permission and whatever i find, i will use in the book. he said, okay. then it took 18 months to get all this in writing. and i was off and running. i found the more remarkable story and i imagine i would find. the story of a man who moves back and forth being outside and inside. i found the third-generation immigrant who cared little about the country that his grandparents had been born in and who no desire to visit ireland or read about it and considered himself 100% american and c
election. a dramatic -- dramatic element in his success and obviously the republican party recognizes it's harsh language, some rhetoric used by mitt romney and other republicans around the country didn't help its chance of gaining support within that community. john boehner, the speaker of the house, has said that they need to have a more practical, a more pragmatic approach to this issue, so i think in many ways the white house feels confidently that -- that it has the lead on this issue right now and that it has the public on its side as well. >> all right. nbc's peter alexander with that latest development. thank you so much, peter. i want to bring in the political reporter for slate and msnbc contributor. dave, what do you think about this? it's called comprehensive immigration reform, so is this a surprise at all? >> oh, it's not a surprise. it was a promise that president obama made when he was elected the first time. >> right. >> the worry i think if you're an advocate for this is when you read stories about who might support this. you don't see many house republicans being quote
writers association had 37 candidates to choose from and elected none, zero, a few players had the whiff of steroids but should that have kept them out of the hall. jason stark doesn't think so. he wrote with cooperstown, quote, if it is a cathedral, not a museum, we are going to have to throw out gaylord perry, sorry, gaylord and everyone that corked a bat or scuffed a ball or used an amphetamine and everyone that was an off the field scoundrel. good morning, jason. >> hi, carol. >> you are one of the sports writers with the power to get someone into the hall. as you sat down with the ballot this year, was it the most agonizing ever? >> absolutely the toughest ever. i actually went and looked at every single ballot since the beginning of hall of fame voting in the 30s i think this was the most star-studded ballot in like 75 years. it's really incredible to think that we elected nobody. we had a candidate that hit more home runs than anybody that ever lived in barry bonds. we didn't elect him. we had a pitcher in roger clemons who won, at the time he retired, more games than any right-ha
of this president. we probably will start right away recruiting challengers for the next elections. local union leaders, local party officials, and activists. we would happily send out an e- mail in the district to those who support medicare and social security and medicaid cuts. host: have you ever want that at some members of congress? guest: we have launched it publicly in the more generic sense, saying this is a warning. we want to be transparent. we don't learn from this nuclear war. for someone like me woke up every day in 2008 and thought, what can i do today to get barack obama elected president. he publicly admitted that he put social security benefits on the table. that's not a position i want to be in and not what i worked for and to thousand eight. host: did you work for it in 2012? guest: our organization prioritized congress in 2012. our number one candidate was elizabeth warren. she's already been told, calling out aig and big wall street bankers yesterday. we raised $1.5 million from grassroots contributions in this last election cycle. we raised $100,000 before she even announc
, joe, is there an element i will pick this fight, i won this election? i will take it to the republicans. >> he won. usual through president gets to have the cabinet he wants. this is the cabinet he wants. this goes back to the cabinet when he put hillary in there. in the first term for secretary of state. hagel told his party no on iraq and tells the president things he doesn't want to hear. the president wants that cabinet. he will get it. >> bret: joe, karl, as always, thank you. soon, we will get a labor nomination added. those hearings will begin. up next, will president obama try a political end-around congress on the debt ceiling? humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's
will encourage elected officials to prevent gun violence and communicate directly with the constituents. very strong language and an op-ed in the u"usa today" she goes after the gun lobby saying special interests purporting to represent gun owners but really advancing the interests of an ideological fringe have used big money and influence to cow congress into submission, rather than working to find the balance between our rights and the regulation of a dangerous product. she goes on to say these groups have cast simple protections for our communities as existential threats to individual liberties. also speaking to abc news, a couple of comments we saw on "good morning america" this morning, let's listen to one of them here. >> okay. >> i have a gun. gabby and i are both gun owners. we are strong supporters of the second amendment, but we've got to do something to keep the guns from getting into the wrong hands. >> when it can happen to children in a classroom, it's time to say -- >> enough. >> so there's the timing, there's their personal experience, all of that coming to bear now as they ta
after the elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because 3,000 americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing to do for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place. and because of the heroic work of our men and women in uniform, and because of the cooperation and sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by that then host government. we achieved our central goal, which is -- or have come very close to achieving our stroll go central goal, which is to decapacitate al qaeda. to dismantle them. to make sure they can't attack us again. and everything that we have done over the last ten years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests, have been focused on that aim. and, you know, at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrific
't going to be done until the next election or until something else changes. this is something that clearly, particularly republicans in the house really want to push. they're going to use every opportunity that they can. we managed to get some of the tax issues taken off the table at the end of last year. that was difficult for a lot of us to watch. but there's still some questions about spending. that's going to come up in the next couple of months. there's appropriations to be done. i imagine that conversation will keep on going. and i was very worried after i first came back to work after the break, because i said, well, what is this going to do for the immigration agenda? having covered this in the past, i know how much energy it takes from members. but i don't think that the members who are going to be the most involved in the fiscal cliff spending kinds of discussions are the same ones who are going to be pushing on immigration. and as long as you have someone in the senate, like majority leader harry reid, who also wants to move forward, i think you're still going to see some action
gratitude. let's give him another round of applause. [applause] to the elected and legislative leaders who have been introduced once before, it's a pleasure to be with you. attorney general, thank you for being here. co-leaders senators, pleasure to be with you, assembly speaker, snot minority leader -- senate minority leader. assembly minority leader, i want to thank them for their leadership because last year and the year before were extraordinary years for this state. and the legislative accomplishments really turned this state around and they were difficult and challenging because it went to the real heart of the issues. but they did it. at this time i would ask the assembly and senate to stand so you can be recognized for your great work. stand please. [applause] members of the court, welcome to all of you, we thank you. [applause] >> as you heard earlier and i hope as you can tell the capitol looks a little bit different than it did over the past few years. the renovation has been complete. the renovation was accelerated and extended. it's complete. the building has been refurbished,
getting tough on hagel. newly-elected senator tammy baldwin, also the first openly gay u.s. senator says she plans on questioning hagel for his anti-gay comments. 14 years ago hagel criticized ambassador james hormel for being aggressively gay. baldwin wants to know if his apology is sufficient and sincere and she wants to see how he's evolved on that issue particularly in the area of don't ask, don't tell. another obama appointment yesterday, he tapped counter terrorism adviser john brennan to lead the c.i.a. much the controversy there has to do with his involvement in the use of armed drones and his views on waterboarding but it is resparking a debate over the white house cyberleaks. president's aides purposely let out some information to help his re-election chances. but some republicans say they won't confirm brennan until the investigations are complete. more bill press is coming up after the break. stay with us. (vo) brought to you by lysol. a mission for health. before the sneeze, help protect with a spray. before the tissue, help defend with a wipe. before the cold & flu seaso
are stock. as mark indicated, they elect a republican house, and that is why everything is in a stalemate. >> look at the new congress and house speaker john boehner's problem. >> for those of you who are returning to have what these aisles before, maybe it is time we get a little awestruck. put simply, we're center not to be something but to do something. >> not to be something but to do something. that's a great idea. were they listening? house speaker john boehner reelected with 220 votes out of 426. pelosi got 192. he has been taking a wicked beating from republicans. we showed chris christie yelling at him that was because of the vote on reliefer hurricane sandy. he is taking a beating. >> because he's trying to do something. he tried to do something in december with his plan b and his party walked on him. he then abdicated his responsibility and lifted up to the senate to act. the senate gave him a proposal and it turned out of his caucus would not support him on doing something about that either. that he has just tried. as part -- his party will not let him. >> he is a deal maker.
's that like high schoolers, our elected leaders are worried more about popularity than actually accomplishing something. we ask only are they conservative enough? are they liberal enough? well, that's the way teenagers evaluate one another? is it she praut enough? is he cool enough? who cares if she's failing math or he's dealing drugs after school? voters need only be reminded that kids today will be running the country tomorrow. let's teach them all a valuable lesson by finally hold our representatives to higher standards. because the message to kids and congress is the same, you aren't special just for existing. that does it for "the cycle." martin, krystal has a message. >> very quickly want to wish my mother and sister heidi a happy birthday. >> that's lovely. many, many warmest congratulations to them. thank you for sharing that. and good afternoon. it's tuesday, january the 8th, and we are two years removed from the tragedy in tucson. two years and 11 more mass shootings in america. >> breaking news from gabrielle giffords. two years ago today she was shot. >> we can't tolerate this an
and election races. joining us is planned parenthood sophia richards. here we are four decades afro v wade, and it is hard for my young people men and women to remember. 50% of the population was born since 1973. people do not remember when it was illegal, when contraception was unavailable, and that could be influencing some of the polling which -- mixed polling which shows a lack of support. it depends on how the question is asked, in the exit polls. it was pretty clear. 59% saying abortion should be legal many most -- if not all circumstances, and only 31% disagree. where do we stand? >> well, actually in the most recent gallop poll, i think, andrea, is 77% of the americans believe abortion should be legal in all or most cases, and it's been consistent ever since roe was decided, and again, for most people in this country, 40 years later, this is an established right that women have. it's an important legal protection, and even what we have seen in the last couple of years is we've had so many attacks in state legislatures and politicians going after women's rights we've seen a resurgen
, the major issue and 1800 e. election and in the 1828 election that was under jackson versus john quincy adams. this question of our weak one nation or a bunch of states? this is what decided the federalist and antifederalist and supporting the constitution and the republicans in the founding and one united the whigs in to the democrats in the next generation. we have always had some people who see the united states primarily as a group of states in contact with each other and who see it as a union and the idea that the founders had a coherent position about state rights and all of them were killed the same thing i think requires you to pretend that they didn't have elections back then because that is what their actions were about. >> host: different parties wanted different things. i think that generally the southerners or more confederate. they saw this more of a compact states, the northerners i think or more as a nation. hamilton very much. hamilton was all still monarchist. hamilton solve this very much as a union. i think there was little of the conditions there was a strong belief
the nra did spend over $11 million in the last election, they only had a 0.83% return on their investment. less than 1% of the candidates they backed won, or the candidates that they ran against lost. less than 1% success rate. less than 1% roi. joining me now to talk about the gun-control landscape and texas politics is wayne slater. wayne is a senior political reporter for "the dallas morning news." he is coming to us from austin, texas. wayne always glad to welcome you inside "the war room." >> great to be with you governor. >> jennifer: you know all about organizing on the right, because you wrote the book on karl rove so can the left counter that kind of power when it comes to guns? >> they need two things, and it appears they have both of them. one is money. you mentioned exactly that. when you have mayor bloomberg who has an awful lot of money and the group he is associated with has put out the commercial of the mother of a nine year old who died in the mass shooting in the gabby giffords shooting and the gabby giffords group itself and so you have
filing paperwork with the federal election commission this week. meanwhile, politoco reports a top aide to democratic senator frank lawsuit enberg called booker "self-absorbed" accusing the mayor of bee trying the democratic party by skipping a run against republican governor chris christie. >>> well, joining me right now we have msnbc contributing and managing editor joy an reid and white house reporter for the "washington post." and with a hello to both of you, david i'm going to go up to you first. let's go to afghanistan with the president accelerating the withdrawal of troops right now. what did we learn from that news conference as to a timeline? >> well, alex, it was very interesting. the words that the president used he kept saying several times not only is the war for americans going to come to an end by the end of 2014, which we all knew, but as soon as this spring america is going to allow the afghan forces around the country to take the lead in securing their own nation. that's moved up the timetable by a few months. what that seems to signal was we may be able to remove the
. and perhaps the election of obama what i take from it that's positive i think a lot of people aspire to that. so, you know, this is the time. i think it is a historic opportunity and some philosophers said danger and opportunity tend to come together and we have both right now. >> let's hear your words. >> well, the occupied movement was the first movement in recent history to respond rationally to the new configuration of power, to the corporate today what is called the system of the inverted totalitarianism. it was an understanding of the formal mechanisms of power no longer work to carry out the end incremental or piecemeal reform as they were designed to do. essentially we are trapped in a system of political paralysis. there is an inability on the part of government to respond rationally and it is a constant theme in paul krugman's columns to the problems that beset us whether that is climate change, or whether that is the financial collapse, the mortgage crisis, the chronic underemployment, unemployment, the fact that a million people a year go bankrupt because they can't pay their med
on and where is your backbone in spending cuts. you have folks saying, you have to realize elections have consequences. the president won. this to say beyond justifying tax hikes, it justified no spending cuts. i don't think that is the americanss saw it. they won't see the math here that hurts democrats and republicans alike if something isn't done? >> here is the question i think the president knows well that this is the question. is california the model we're going to follow? they are $165 billion to $335 billion in debt. they say they might have a surplus because they raised taxes, but in fact, $5.2 billion of that $6 billion a year is going to debt service alone. they are sort of swimming in debt. the other states are adding jobs and doing pretty well and i would add, many people argue against texas they are not spending enough on services. when it comes to education, they are in some cases, spending less money and across hispanic, white and black pop liaghz they are out performing california and out performing the national average. >> neil: bottom line. >> they are getting better re
election. it had been one of the hardest fought campaigns in recent memory. texas governor versus the vice-president and when the election results came in the vice-president won the popular vote because florida was too close to call, it went into equivalent of overtime, remember the pregnant, hanging and dip pelled chads and after challenges to the supreme court, 5-4 to halt the recall in florida and bush took florida getting the 25 needed electoral votes and he took the oath of office and lawmakers recognizing george w. bush 12 years ago. and is his parents' 68th wedding anniversary, they're now the longest married presidential couple in history. they met at a christmas dance in connecticut in 1941, married four years later and mr. bush, wearing his officer's uniform. he was 21 and on leave from active duty in world war ii as a navy pilot. mrs. bush was 20 and her groom was the first boy she'd ever kissed. president bush is still in a houston hospital for related cough and he's in a regular that's the news for today. huckabee is next. >>> tonight on huckabee the president and democrats go
. tweeting last week on the bill is to "repeal obama care in its xwir entirety." is the last election resonating at all with congressman bachmann? >> this is congresswoman bachmann advancing her views in a way that will go absolutely no where. zero prospect that will happen. but, again, when you have people in districts who are reflecting the most extreme elements in their own party, because primaries are where they face the greatest potential risk, this is what you get. and, you know, michele bachmann made her name as somebody on the right wing of the republican party who was especially aggressive and in your face to democrats and to president obama in particular, she certainly wants to maintain that reputation, and she is not going to get anywhere legislatively with this, but this doesn't -- given who she, what her identity is, probably doesn't hurt her that much politically. >> overall, john, is this a sign that we're off to a certain kind of start? did the 113th congress be as unproductive as 112th was? >> well, we've never left a position, alex, of permanent warfare between two p
: and we continue our series of conversations with newly elected members of congress. tonight: texas republican senator ted cruz, a vocal opponent of the eleventh-hour fiscal cliff deal. >> i would have voted against it because i think it was a lousy deal. it wasn't a serious response to the grave fiscal and economic problems facing this country. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 2t century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: today's announcement at the white house sets up a pair of potential confirmation fights. president obama's choices to oversee t pentagon and the c.i.a. will now be called to answer questions about everything from israel to iran
in future elections to the hall of fame. >>> let's take a quick look at the big board here. we have the dow before the "closing bell" in a matter of seconds. up 61 points. right at 13,390 for the day. you can always follow me on @brookeb. got to be with you. now to wolf blitzer in washington. wolf? >>> brooks, thanks very much. happening now -- >> when we hit the dock, everybody went flying. >> all of a sudden we just hit. boom. and people were catapulted forward. >> the search for answers as to why a packed ferry boat didn't stop in time, crashing into a dock and injuring dozens of new york city commuters. >>> also, vice president joe biden hears from the victims of gun violence. still to come, the nation's biggest gun seller and the nra. >>> plus, from my visit to egypt, the writing on the wall, the graphite in tahrir square tells the story of a revolution that many fear is going wrong. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we begin right here in washington with important news. the vice president joe biden met with victims of gun violence and gun safety advocates. they spent s
are trying to unseat him. >> this is not an election year for the senate this is an election year for governor. >> people who love him and support him should stop loving and support you when you run for his seat. >> i have a deep respect and love for him. he has given a long degree of service. we should all respect that, and, look this is a loyon of our senate and i'll give him that space. this isn't an election year. fiscal cliff, the sandy aid, debt ceiling, a lot of issues we need him in the saddle, focused in the job, not focused as mayor of the city of newark. >> you always get these blowing, rave, wonderful articles. "the new york times," not nice at all, they say are you a better marketer than mayor. is it hurtful? >> probably one of the more frustrating articles of my career. they glossed over what we have done, since instituting court reform, prisoner entry reform, doubled the amount of affordable housing to dealing with veterans issues. a frustrating article. but as you said, sometimes you won't get flowing press. the press sometimes likes to build you up and take you do
in the 2012 laerksz the republican party is now searching for a way to recover and beyond the election loss, there's house speaker john boehner, he's had his own problems lose ageffort to get support from his colleagues for a last ditch fiscal cliff measure. another story the tea party wing in the gop still has influence. and that sometimes causes major divisions. so is it time for the party to change? does it need to become a big tent? rich galen joins us from washington, a republican strategist. rich, i guess you could say the gop has its own bad case of the flu. what's the cure here? >> part of it is is just as with the flu for most people, wait it out. take plenty of water, go to bed and wait till you feel better. that's part of what's going to have to happen here. these things in washington tend to be cyclical. in terms of what the republicans in the house are going through, it's useful to remember, when i first came back to washington in 1996, i talked to a friend. i was working for newt gingrich. i was talking to a friend who worked for tip o'neill. i said how did tip spend his day?
on this, but it's fascinating to look at this in the broader context of the 2014 elections, and even after 2016, where i think what the liberal groups hope to do right now is consolidate their victories in 2012 and expand on them over the next four years. >> megyn: to what extent can they accomplish these goals? because these are not moneyless, powerless groups? these are heavy hitters and now going to work together and they say it's up to 30 to 35 groups that are going to work together to accomplish these goals. >> we've seen that the president has been responsive to pushes from his left in his first term. if you look, for instance, at what happened with the keystone pipeline, there were basically threats by the environmental groups that they were not going to take their access out, not going door-to-door for the president if in tactful fact backed the keystone pipeline. i'm not sure you can drawing a correlation between those two, but there's no question that that agitation had an influence on the white house and with the president and we've seen that with other groups and i think that's
not work. >> government is promising a bunch of free stuff, that is how president obama got elected. the fact of the matter is it is not free, it is very expensive and the middle class is going to have to pay for it but we simply can't afford the amount of government we have been promised and you have the government trying to write the giant ponzi schemes. it can't work, it is impossible to reform these programs in the way it will work. we have to acknowledge that and will never get the kind of economic growth you're talking about 4%, 5% per year unless we let the economy restructure. they had to let interest rates go up, they are much too low to encourage savings and investments aninvestmentand allo restructure meaning a lot of people have to lose a lot of money. people have to stop spending so they can start saving so to have capital investments needed to grow the economy. melissa: i think i'm depressed, none of those things will happen. power panel, thank you very much. coming up next on "money," the u.s. now has the most exnsive corn. fresh government subsidies and ethanol produ
much the president feels empowered by his second election, you know, the inauguration a couple of days away and what his read is on where the country is on this issue. we heard from gabrielle giffords and mark kelly the other day, they say they are gun owners but want to see restrictions on assault weapons and multiple clips. what is your sense for which way this is going? when. >> reporter: you know, at the beginning, soon after newtown and at the beginning of this back and forth it seemed like that could have a lot of votes in congress to move through. it seems as often has happened that sides, they go to their corners. we'll see after the vice president comes out with the tax force recommendations whether there is some coming together on some solutions. what hasn't been talked about a lot are the mental health aspects of this. or the hollywood aspect of it, and we haven't focused on it. so if there is a comprehensive approach to it, perhaps it will get more people involved. martha: as you said coming into this there are so many laws already on the books that are just not enforced, m
elected representatives although i consider myself neither a republican or democrat i look forward to working closely on both sides of the aisle. most importantly, my wife cathy to my children kyle, to my parents in new jersey, a shout out. owen who is 92. i can not be where i am today without their love, patience, understanding, and support. there's no way i can ever repay them except to say i will need it for a little bit longer. i am deeply grateful for this opportunity. it will be bittersweet to leave all of my close colleagues and friends here at the white house and that the national security staff but come to work with in respect so deeply. if confirmed by the senate i will consider it to be an honor of my life. >> these are four outstanding individuals. we are grateful to all of them. i want in particular to think mike morrell and leon panetta for their extraordinary service. i just want to repeat i hope the senate will act on these confirmations promptly. when it comes to security we do not bite to leave a lot of gaps between the time one set of leaders transitions out of a
right. something has to be done. the amount increases. the election cycle is continuous where once it was short. other countries of found ways to restrict fact to a shorter time frame which at least would save some money. >> host: doesn't that open more loopholes? if you restrict the time? wouldn't there be ways around that? >> guest: we are very inventive in this country and no doubt folks around a political process, perhaps the only difference would be we would save a little money and a lot of people are looking at this, we couldn't agree more that that is the root of the problem. the can't change the tax code or free trade or deregulation or the whole issue of debt financing until we figure out a way to get behind the influence of money. >> guest: this is not easy. it may not even be possible if the supreme court has deemed money and exercise of free speech. that really raises the bar on us. it means anything goes from here on out. >> host: a tweet for you gentlemen, how are the people to understand the true amount of what the government spends? where is there accessible, unders
saw -- i know he saw the steven spielberg movie "lincoln" which president lincoln says, i am the re-elected president clothed in immense power. >> the president doesn't have to worry about getting re-elected a third time. he can do a lot. >> there's another scene that is not a movie. it's the scene of harry truman sitting at his desk just before he left and losing and say, poor ike, do this, do that, and nothing will happen. presidents have the power to persuade. the president may be feeling very inflated right now. obviously he is. but the grind of politics and congress is the stronger branch. >>> let's talk about the vice president of the united states. he spoke out on his task force to deal with the issue of guns. listen to what he said today. >> the president is going to act. executive orders, executive action can be taken. we haven't decided what that is yet but we're compiling it all with the help of the attorney general and all the rest of the cabinet members as well as legislative action we believe is required. >> now, executive orders, the president just signs it. it's done. he doe
the great midterm election. can you now come back to a party that is less popular than cockroaches? and root canal and tell them you really don't want to do this? >> look, the party has a big political problem that has been -- around for now two years. and it's about how we communicate those very principles and value how we've talked about the economy and how we've talked about evolving everybody in the rehabilitation. that laundry list that you gave earlier is so true. all of those things happens if the government shuts down. but all of those things happen, also, if we continue to spend the way we intend because whether it's today or tomorrow, the bill will come due. the republicans have the opportunity to make the argument to touch on a better management of our government and touch on creating the types of incentives in the economy so that we rely less on government spending and government programs and more on the private sector. >> i think that we're going to have to go, but i think that the spending is not the question that any of us are saying is not a question that we're going to have
were to call you, our elected leaders in washington said ed, what should we do about this, what do you tell them? >> we have to have a long-term plan to cut our spending. investors need to get out of all their fixed income tax investors because when interest rates rise, it hurts them. i would tell all of the people who would call me, be very careful about fixed income. let's get our spending under control. >> rick: on the debt ceiling issue, if washington were to call you and say, what should we do? >> if washington wash was to call me and ask me, we would have to cut spending. no way to get out of it. >> rick: raising or inspect raising the debt ceiling? what's your opinion? >> we've got to raise the debt ceiling. we have no choice. >> rick: thank you very much. ed is managing partner at chapwood investment. good to see you. >> arthel: there is yet another new petition on the white house web site. the subject of this one, president obama's pick for treasury secretary jack lew. as you might know, he has a knack with his loopy john hancock. there it is. now fans of his loops are petitio
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